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Categories of breeding status

Categories of breeding status for the Waterford Breeding Bird Atlas

 

 

Broad category and detailed code

Definition

 

 

Birds not actually ‘using’ a tetrad

 

 

Bird directly flying over tetrad  (or flying past off coast within tetrad) without foraging/circling and without being seen to alight on or take off from land or sea within tetrad*

 

 

Suspected

non-breeding

 

M

suspected on Migration [include late winterers]

U

suspected sUmmering non-breeder

 

 

Possible breeding

 

H

seen/heard in suitable Habitat

S

Singing male(s) in suitable habitat, 1 date

 

 

Probable breeding

 

P

Pair(s) in suitable nesting habitat

T

Territory presumed (e.g. singing same place a week apart)**

D

Display & courtship nr nesting habitat

N

visiting probable Nest site

A

Anxiety call/agitated behaviour

I

brood patch suggesting Incubation

B

Building nest or excavating nest hole

 

 

Confirmed breeding

 

DD

Distraction Display or feigning injur

UN

Used nest or eggshells (same year)

FL

recently FLedged young or mobile downy young

ON

Occupied Nest visited or incubated

FF

adult carrying Food or Faecal sac

NE

Nest with Eggs

NY

Nest with Young

 

Definition of species “using” a tetrad:

This means any species making use of the tetrad for any purpose other than simply flying over. For example, gulls flying over are not considered to be using it, but Swallows taking insects in the air and Kestrels hovering are.  *Use an arrow [→] for any species flying directly over a tetrad, or past along coast (but within tetrad area).

 

**Note on defining a “Territory”:

 Use code “T” if you note, for example, a singing male in the same place on more than one visit separated by a least a week; two or more singing birds audible at the same time; or two males indulging in territorial squabbling.

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